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Endoscopy

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Endoscopy is a nonsurgical procedure used to examine a person's digestive tract. Using an endoscope, a flexible tube with a light source and video camera, your doctor can view your digestive tract on a color TV monitor in real time. There are two types of procedures completed while in the Endoscopy department:

  1. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) - an endoscope is easily passed through the mouth and throat, down the esophagus, allowing the doctor to view the esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine called the duodenum.
  2. Colonoscopy (colon) - an endoscope is passed through the rectum to examine the large intestine.
    • Colonoscopy is the number one method of early detection for Colorectal Cancer in adults.
Endoscopy can be used to both diagnose and treat digestive tract problems during the time of the procedure. There are many interventions the gastroenterologist can perform through the endoscope, like stopping a bleeding ulcer, or removing a polyp, or even taking biopsies (removal of tissue) to look for the presence of disease.

Why Do I Need an Endoscopy/Colonoscopy?


Doctors will often recommend endoscopy to evaluate:

  • Stomach pain
  • Ulcers, gastritis, or difficulty swallowing
  • Digestive tract bleeding
  • Changes in bowl habits (chronic constipation or diarrhea)
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening (CRCS)/Polyps or growths in the colon identified through imaging (MRI/CT scans)

How Do I Prepare for Endoscopy?


Examining the upper digestive tract (upper endoscopy) requires nothing more than fasting for 6-8 hours prior to the procedure. To examine the colon, it must be cleared of stool. Therefore, a laxative prep given on the day before the procedure.

Sedation. For most examinations with an endoscope, a sedative is provided, this increases the comfort of the individual undergoing the examination. The sedative, which is administered via an injection into the vein, allows for relaxation and light sleep. There are usually few if any recollections of the procedure. Patients wake up within an hour, but the effects of the medicines are more prolonged, so it is not safe to drive until the next day.

General anesthesia (puts you fully asleep for a period of time) is given on a case-by-case basis, and in special circumstances when the physician deems it necessary.

Is Endoscopy/Colonoscopy Safe?


Overall, endoscopy is very safe; however, the procedure does have a few but rare potential complications, which may include, but not limited to:

  • Perforation (tear in the gastrointestinal wall)
  • Reaction to sedation
  • Infection
  • Bleeding

Who Performs Endoscopy?


Gastroenterology specialists (gastroenterologists) will perform the endoscopy procedures, with the assistance of specialty-trained nurses and technicians.

Where is the Endoscopy Department located?


The Endoscopy Department is located on the 3rd floor in the south tower of Midland Memorial Hospital. Hours of operation are Monday-Friday from 6:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. The staff at the Endoscopy department can be reached anytime during hours of operation by calling (432) 221-4601.


Endoscopy is not home to new technology and procedures - Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu™) and Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry). Learn more about each below.

Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu)


A. What is Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu)?
A Mucosal Integrity Acquisition and Analysis Study, or MiVu, is a procedure used to aid in the diagnoses of GERD, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and Non-GERD. It can also be used to monitor treatment response for patients with GERD and EoE. This diagnostic test is performed at the same time as an upper endoscopy or EGD, only adding 5 minutes to your overall procedure time. An EGD is a nonsurgical procedure used to examine a person's digestive tract. A flexible scope with a light source and video camera is passed down your esophagus so your doctor can view your digestive tract on a color TV monitor in real time. The MiVu Balloon Probe incorporates sensors along a 10 cm segment of the esophagus to measure esophageal mucosal integrity. Your physician is then able to use the real time data from this procedure to confirm your diagnosis and treatment plan.

B. Why do I need the Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu)?
The Mucosal Integrity Analysis is used to identify and diagnose GERD, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and Non-GERD and to monitor treatment response in GERD and EoE.

C. How do I prepare for the Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu)?
Do not eat or drink anything 6-8 hours prior to the procedure.

D. Sedation
During the procedure a sedative is given, this increases the comfort of the individual undergoing the examination. The sedative is given through an IV and allows for relaxation and light sleep. There are usually few if any recollections of the procedure, and patients wake up within an hour. But the effects of the medication can last for hours so it is not safe to drive until the next day, so a responsible person is needed to drive you home.

E. Is the Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu) Safe?
Overall, the Mucosal Integrity Analysis is very safe; however, the procedure does have a few but rare potential complications, which may include, but not limited to:
  • Cardiorespiratory Arrest
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Perforation
  • Sore Throat
  • Aspiration

F. Who performs Mucosal Integrity Analysis (MiVu)?
Gastroenterology specialists (gastroenterologists) will perform the endoscopy procedures, with the assistance of specialty-trained nurses and technicians.

Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry)

A. What is Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry)?
An Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry) is a diagnostic test that will evaluate the function of your esophagus. The esophagus is a muscular hallow tube that transports food from your mouth to your stomach. When you undergo an Esophageal Motility Study, the pressure along the length of your esophagus will be measured. The pattern in which your esophagus contracts to push food into the stomach will also be measured. Your doctor will use these measurements to determine the best plan for you.

B. Why do I need Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry)?
The study is performed to help identify causes for various symptoms such as difficulty swallowing and/or chest pain. It is also performed before certain medical procedures such as anti-reflux surgery.

C. How do I prepare for Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry)?

  • Do not eat or drink for 6 hours prior to your procedure.
  • Ask your healthcare provider if you are taking medications for reflux, diabetes, or blood thinners.
    • Taking medications such as aspirin and ibuprofen can thin your blood. Do not take these medications unless your health care provider tells you to take them.
D. Is the Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry) Safe?
Overall, an esophageal motility study is very safe; however, the procedure does have a few but rare potential complications, which may include, but not limited to:
  • Sore Throat
  • Nosebleed
  • Aspiration
  • Vagal Stimulation (Faintness, Dizziness, Syncope)
E. Who performs the Esophageal Motility Study (Manometry)?
A nurse with specialty-training in Manometry and Motility procedures will perform your procedure for the ordering provide
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